Monday, November 21, 2005

Calpella, Ca.
We lived in the mill camp until we moved to Thorton, Ar. in 1953 or early 1954.
I remember the large redwood logs at the mill. Some were so large they were actually quartered to be small enough to be hauled on a log truck. We have a picture of my brother George (about 9 or 10 years old) standing at the end of a log and he was less than 1/2 the hieght of the log.
The houses we lived in had "tar paper" on the outside to cover the cracks.
I remember the log trucks did not have "turn signal lights" but instead had an arm that hang on the drivers side of the cab with a cable on the inside so the driver could raise it to 90 degrees for a lrft turn or up 180 degrees for a right turn. The trucks were Diamand T or Reo brands. They formed my love afair with cars and trucks.
We moved back to Arkansas in a 1940 Mercury. On our trip to Arkansas we ran over some dead sheep in the road (we assumed they fell to their death off a truck as there was several of them scattered down the highway) one night and if it hadn't been for the trailer we were pulling we would have most likely had a bad wreck but as it was the trailer kept us from leaving the road and down a ravine.

5 Comments:

Blogger dragonfly183 said...

do you still live in Arkansas?

9:28 AM  
Blogger Ggraph said...

Geat story and well told!
Regards,
Mark

12:14 AM  
Blogger Wendy A said...

Thanks for visiting my blog. The light house in Devonport Tasmania is still shining.
I remember those redwood logs too. The university that I graduated from back in the mid 80's sported some stunning redwoods. There is still the odd imported Calif. redwood here in Tassie. Certainly a piece o history.

Cheers from Down Under

4:52 AM  
Blogger Dee said...

It has been about forty years since I have been to that neck of the woods and it is lovely. Great story though.

10:01 PM  
Blogger SkyeBlue2U said...

Oh, I'd love to hear more about the Diamond, and the Reo trucks. Great story and thank you for swinging by my site. :)

9:52 PM  

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